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Athabasca University

Bannock and a Movie 2014

Title Athabasca Edmonton

Force of Nature Part 2 of 2
Running Time: 45 mins.

Award winning director Sturla Gunnarsson presents a biography of ideas featuring iconic Canadian scientist, educator, broadcaster and activist David Suzuki. At 73 years of age Suzuki delivered what he describes as "a last lecture – a distillation of my life and thoughts, my legacy, what I want to say before I die" "For the first time since life appeared on earth, one species - us - is singlehandedly altering the physical, chemical and biological nature of earth. We have become a force of nature." - David Suzuki

 

January 24, 2014

Crime Stories: The Killer Schoolboys
Running Time: 45 mins.

Crime Stories is a documentary television series that takes the viewer behind the yellow tape, witnessing investigators as they work to capture modern monsters. Episode # 53 The Killer Schoolboys 1995. The brutally beaten body of First Nations sex trade worker Pamela George is discovered on a cold spring morning. Two popular university students are charged with first degree murder in the death of Ms. George.

 

February 21, 2014

Vanishing Point Part 1
Running Time: 40 mins.

This compelling story of Navarana, an Inughuit elder from Northwest Greenland who is linked to Canada's Inuit through a migration led by an intrepid shaman. At a time when Inuit face the greatest social and environmental challenges in their history, Navarana hopes to find the key to making the right choices for her people’s survival.

 

March 21, 2014

Vanishing Point Part 2 of 2
Running Time: 40 mins.

This compelling story of Navarana, an Inughuit elder from Northwest Greenland who is linked to Canada's Inuit through a migration led by an intrepid shaman. At a time when Inuit face the greatest social and environmental challenges in their history, Navarana hopes to find the key to making the right choices for her people’s survival.

 

April 25, 2014

We Were Children - Part 1
Running Time: 40 mins.

In this emotional film, the profound impact of the Canadian government’s residential school system is conveyed unflinchingly through the eyes of two children who were forced to face hardships beyond their years. We Were Children gives voice to a national tragedy and demonstrates the incredible resilience of the human spirit.

 

May 23, 2014

We Were Children - Part 2
Running Time: 40 mins.

In this emotional film, the profound impact of the Canadian government’s residential school system is conveyed unflinchingly through the eyes of two children who were forced to face hardships beyond their years. We Were Children gives voice to a national tragedy and demonstrates the incredible resilience of the human spirit.

 

June 20, 2014

The People of Kattawapiskak River
Running Time: 50 mins.

Alanis Obomsawin’s documentary The People of Kattawapiakak River exposes the dreadful living conditions of 1,700 Cree in Northern Ontario. Hundreds of families have no running water or electricity in a village where temperatures drop to minus 40 degrees. In 2011 a state emergency was declared to confront the severe housing crisis. How could such a situation arise in one of the world’s richest countries?

 

September 19, 2014

Hi-Ho Mistahey - Part 1 of 2
Running Time: 50 mins.

In this documentary, Hi-Ho Mistahey, Alanis Obomsawin tells the story of Shannen, who is from the Attawapiskat First Nation. Shannen’s Dream is a national campaign to provide equitable access to education in safe and suitable schools for First Nations children. Strong participation in this initiative eventually brings Shannen's Dream all the way to the United Nations in Geneva. The film title Hi-Ho Mistahey has its roots in Shannen’s family. Her parents would often say to their children, when they were toddlers, “I love you mistahey” (translates to “forever”) but the kids couldn’t pronounce “I love you” and instead, would respond,“Hi-ho mistahey!”

 

October 24, 2014

Hi-Ho Mistahey - Part 2 of 2
Running Time: 50 mins.

In this documentary, Hi-Ho Mistahey, Alanis Obomsawin tells the story of Shannen, who is from the Attawapiskat First Nation. Shannen’s Dream is a national campaign to provide equitable access to education in safe and suitable schools for First Nations children. Strong participation in this initiative eventually brings Shannen's Dream all the way to the United Nations in Geneva. The film title Hi-Ho Mistahey has its roots in Shannen’s family. Her parents would often say to their children, when they were toddlers, “I love you mistahey” (translates to “forever”) but the kids couldn’t pronounce “I love you” and instead, would respond,“Hi-ho mistahey!”

 

November 21, 2014

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Updated July 16 2015 by Student & Academic Services

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